History of the Golden Fiber

bW Chronicles
published:
October 10, 2020
Words:

The Golden Fiber, commonly known as Jute, has found its place in the homes of the rich as carpets, rugs, wall decors, to the mud huts where people used to make sacs, clothes and twines. Jute production dates to the 17th century. The British East India Company was the first to trade Jute to Dundee in Scotland. The spinners, awed at the soothing appearance, biodegradable nature and the versatility of the fiber, learnt the skill of spinning Jute yarn by using machinery. They were called the Jute Barons of Scotland. Kolkata (the then Calcutta) in India became the hub for the export of raw Jute. The first Jute mill was established at Rishra, on the banks of river Hooghly near Calcutta in 1855. The Jute industry enjoyed a continued expansion there on. Today, India is the largest producer as well as consumer of Jute.

Kolkata (then Calcutta) in India became the hub for the export of raw Jute. The first Jute mill was established at Rishra, on the banks of river Hooghly near Calcutta in 1855.

Jute sacs


Jute’s rising prominence in handicrafts

A bit of craftsmanship can transform the ordinary looking fiber to awe inspiring artefacts. Jute enjoys high demand in home décor in forms of carpets, wallhangings, baskets, coasters, lamp shades, bottle cases, planters, to bags,clothes, shoes and jewelry.

The Woman believes in holding on to the traditions and values that lie in each strand of the fiber and passing it down to the generations to cherish the simple yet sophisticated identity of Jute.